St Andrews Day

On Friday 29th November 2019, the traditional red of the St Paul’s CofE Primary School uniform will miraculously alter to blue! Don’t worry. We haven’t changed our uniform. The is to celebrate St Andrews Day! Children are asked to wear blue on this special day to show our appreciation of this very important Patron Saint of Scotland.

Although St. Andrew is the Patron Saint of Scotland, he was not Scottish. The patron saint was born in Bethsaida, in Galilee, which is now Israel. His remains were moved 300 years after his death to Constantinople, now Istanbul, by the Emperor Constantine. While he was generally revered in Scotland from around 1,000 AD, he didn’t become its official patron saint until the signing of the Declaration of Arbroath in 1320.

Andrew was a fisherman before he and his brother Simon Peter became two of the 12 disciples of Jesus. He was baptised by John the Baptist and was the first disciple of Jesus. In the Greek Orthodox tradition he is known as “Prōtoklētos” (Πρωτόκλητος) – literally “the first-called”.

Considered Jesus’ first disciple, Andrew did not become the official patron saint of Scotland until about 1,300 years after his death – and never actually set foot in the country during his lifetime. St Andrew is not just the patron saint of Scotland. He is the patron saint of Greece, Russia, Italy’s Amalfi and Barbados. As well as other countries, he’s the patront saint of singers, spinsters, maidens, fishmongers, fishermen, women wanting to be mothers, gout and sore throats. St Andrew is also the patron saint of the Order of the Thistle, one of the highest ranks of chivalry in the world, second only to the Order of the Garter.